Today’s Tidbit | March 27, 1797 – Charles Francois Xavier Voiland

On this date, in 1797, my third great grandfather, Charles Francois Xavier Voiland, was born in Essert, Belfort, France. He was a farmer. In October of 1857, at the age of 60, he emigrated to America with his wife, Adelaide, and daughters, Madelaine, Catherine Philomen, Julie and Adele.

More about the Voiland/Weller family can be found here.

Family Matters | EMILE ROMON

Emile Francois Romon was born in 1834 in Urcerey, France. He made his apprenticeship as a blacksmith and worked in several localities of the region before his departure for the United States in 1854. He often entertained the younger generation with graphic descriptions of his trip to America, which was by sailing vessel and lasted six weeks.  For a year, he lived in the state of New York, and then came westward.  He settled in the town of Royalton, Wisconsin.

Emile enlisted in the Civil War in 1864. He was a private in Company F, 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery.

Born:  June 2, 1834 in Urcerey, Belfort, France
Married:  Anna Conroy on June 23, 1859 in WI, Elizabeth Rossey on September 2, 1869 in WI
Died:  November 19, 1915 in Weyauwega, Waupaca Co., WI

Relation:  2nd Great Grand Uncle

 

 

 

 

Family Matters | HENRY HERRICK

Henry Herrick, along with his wife Editha, were among the original thirty who founded the First Church of Salem, MA in 1629. This was the first Puritan Church in the new colony. They arrived as part of the Higginson and Skelton fleet (Winthrop) to Salem in 1629.  Rev. Francis Higginson and Rev. Samuel Skelton were the spiritual leaders of the fleet of five ships and about 300 settlers sent to Nahumkeake (Salem) by the Massachusetts Bay Company in 1629.

Born:  1598 in England
Married:  Editha Laskin about 1630 in Salem, Essex Co., Massachusetts Bay Colony
Died:  March 28, 1671 in Beverly, Essex Co., Massachusetts Bay Colony

Relation:  9th Great Grandfather

Family Matters | LYSANDER ORMSBY

Lysander Ormsby was born in Massachusetts and lived there until April of 1837, when resolving to see something of the great West, he started out and made his way by team to Albany, NY, the nearest point to the Erie Canal, and then by canal to Buffalo.

After arriving in Buffalo, Lysander had to wait two weeks for the ice to break up. He hired a team to Dunkirk and then took a steamer for Toledo, OH, which was just a small village. From there he made his way to Blissfield, MI via the Erie and Kalamazoo Railroad, which had just been completed to Adrian. The train cars were pulled by horses over wooden rails.

Lysander spent his first summer in Blissfield and then moved to nearby Summerfield Township, where he purchased thirty-five acres of timber land and put up a log house. He had married Olive Burnham in 1840, and a substantial frame dwelling took the place of the log cabin. They later moved to Deerfield where he worked as a clerk in a general store. Two years later, he bought a stave mill and then opened a grocery store.

After 1877, Lysander devoted his time and attention to the duties of his office. He was appointed Notary Public in 1855, and continued to receive the appointment every four years after that for many years.  He served as postmaster for a period of ten years and was Village Attorney for some time.

Born:  July 5, 1855 in Westhampton, Hampshire Co., MA
Married:  Olive Clerinda Burnham on February 27, 1840, Mary Ellen Masters on February 24, 1887
Died:  January 23, 1911 in Deerfield, Lenawee Co., MI and is buried in the Deerfield Twp. Cemetery

Relation:  5th cousin, 4 times removed

**Much of this content was taken from An Index of Pioneers from Massachusetts to the West. The photo courtesy of http://www.ormsby.org.

 

Family Matters | SAMUEL CLEAVELAND

He spelled his name Samuell. One of the first to settle in Connecticut, he joined the migration of families to found the new town of Canterbury. He served as a soldier in King Philip’s War in 1675/76 and held the rank of Sergeant. A petition was written to the army, from his brother Moses, to release Samuel early. Moses was injured, and could not bring in the crops without Samuel’s help. Samuel was released.

Born:  June 9, 1657 in Woburn, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts Bay Colony
Married:  3 times – Jane Keyes, Persis Hildreth, Margaret Fish
Died:  March 12, 1736 in Canterbury, Windham Co., Connecticut Colony

Buried:  Cleveland Cemetery, Canterbury, CT

Relation:  7th Great Grandfather

Ancestor Approved Award

I am honored that Dr. Bill Smith, who writes the blog, Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories, has chosen me as a recipient of the Ancestor Approved Award. This award was created by Leslie Ann Ballou as “a way to let my fellow genealogy bloggers know how much I appreciate and enjoy their blogs full of tips and tricks as well as funny and heartwarming stories”.

It’s gratifying to know (and I’m sure many bloggers would agree) that people are actually reading what I write and are enjoying it.

The rules of this award state that the recipient list ten things they have learned about any of their ancestors that has surprised, humbled, or enlightened them and then pass the award along to ten other bloggers who they feel are doing their ancestors proud. I’m happy to pass the award to the following bloggers:

Denise Barrett Olson  -  http://family.moultriecreek.us/

Julie Cahill Tarr  -  http://genblogjulie.blogspot.com/

Jasia Smasha  -  http://creativegene.blogspot.com/

Sally Jacobs  -  http://practicalarchivist.com/blog/

Ben Sayer  -  http://macgenealogist.com/

Brenda K. Wolfgram Moore  -  http://gtags79.blogspot.com

Roger Moffat  -  http://lisaandroger.com/

Lee Drew  -  http://famhist.wordpress.com/

Karen Krugman  -  http://genealogyframeofmind.blogspot.com/

Cheryl Fleming Palmer  -  http://heritagehappens.blogspot.com/

Some of the things I have learned that have surprised, humbled, or enlightened me will have to wait for another time.

Thanks again, Bill, for this award! I really appreciate it.