Backgrounds of My Families

This is some background information for the eight families (mine and my wife’s) of my grandparents’ generation.

Harris

Our Harris family is of English decent. Their ancestry can be traced back to the earliest days of our country. John Earl Harris was born in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY in 1798. He married Nancy Ormsbee in 1820. The Ormsbee family originally came to America in the 1630′s, settling in Maine, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Nancy’s father Joshua fought in the Revolutionary War and travelled to Greenfield with his family around 1796. John Earl, Nancy and their descendents moved on to Pierpont Ohio, Town of Morgan Indiana, and eventually Cato, Manitowoc Co., WI. There, they engaged in the mill business. Related families include Seybold, Protz, Cleveland, Ormsbee, Benjamin, Newcomb and Bradford.

Harvey

George Harvey and his wife Elizabeth (Louden) were married in England in 1859. Soon after, they came to America and settled in Leoni Twp., Jackson Co., Michigan. Their son and grandson farmed on Harvey Road in Waterloo Twp., Jackson Co., MI. Related families include Musbach, Louden, Notten and Kruse.

Hau

Came to America from Prussia in the early 1860′s. According to family stories, Wilhelm Hau was a land owner in Prussia. He settled in Russel Twp., Sheboygan Co., Wisconsin. He married Kathrine Tuepper in January of 1869. Her family was also from Prussia and settled in Marshfield Twp., Fond du Lac Co., WI, where they farmed. Wilhelm and Kathrine’s descendants remained in the county, with our family owning a restaurant in Fond du Lac. Related families include Fuhrmann, Tuepper and Michels.

Heim

Our Heim family came to America in the 1840′s. Damian Heim was born in Steinbach Germany in 1815. His wife, Regina, was from the same area. They settled in Sylvan Twp., Washtenaw Co., Michigan. Related families include Gage, Hoppe, Parker, Knight and Lombard.

Hela/Heller

Laurentius Hela, his wife Elizabeth (Fleming), and their five children arrived in America from Prussia/Poland in May of 1866. They settled in Princeton, Green Lake Co., Wisconsin. Their grandson, Francis (Frank) married Catherine Jackowski in 1905. Her family was also from Prussia/Poland. Frank worked in the granite quarry in Montello, WI. Related families include Jackowski, Soda and Swiderski.

LeVan

The LeVan family was among the German-speaking French Huguenot refugees who fled from France to Holland, probably after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. Family tradition says they were manufacturers of brocade and taffetas in their native country, and that they were of considerable wealth.

Jacob LeVan was born about 1702 in Amsterdam. Records indicate he came to America around 1717. Jacob married Mary about 1725 in Maxatawny Twp., Berks Co., Pennsylvania. The family lived for many generations in Berks Co. They moved to Logan Co., Ohio and eventually to Waterloo Twp., Jackson Co., Michigan. Related families include Robison, Winner, Leymaster and Leidigh.

McConnell

Our McConnell family can only be traced back to the early 1800′s. Charles Russell McConnell was born in New York in 1828. He married Sophia Laib in Kent Co., Michigan in 1859. She was born in Ohio in 1837. They farmed in Carmel Twp., Eaton Co., MI. Related families include Bradley, Laib, Blackmer, Kimball and Lankton.

Voiland/Weller

Originated from the town of Essert in the Territory of Belfort, France. Charles Xavier (Jean Baptiste) Voiland, his wife Adelaide (Perrin) and their children arrived at Castle Garden in New York City in December of 1857. His son Joseph Voiland and wife Felicitée Marie (Sadie) Romond arrived in New York City in May of 1857. Sadie’s family was from the town of Urcerey, also in the Territory of Belfort. Joseph and Sadie traveled to Buffalo, NY, and then settled in Little Wolf Twp., Waupaca County, Wisconsin.

The family name was changed to “Weller” when their children started school in Wisconsin. Their German school teacher couldn’t pronounce the French name “Voiland” and so it was changed to reflect the German pronunciation “Weller”. Their descendants remained in Waupaca County, with our family living in Clintonville and owning a hardware store. Related families include Heinke, Romond and Eglin.

There was also a Voiland family that came from Cravanche, another small village in the Territory of Belfort, France, in the 1850’s. Thibeau (Tebo) Voiland, his wife Marie (Frossard), and their eight children arrived in America on October 15, 1852, and settled in Macomb Co., Michigan, just north of Detroit. The homestead was located a short distance west of Gratiot Avenue between what is now Fourteen Mile Road and Masonic Boulevard.

We are unable to connect the Michigan Voilands to our Wisconsin Voilands. Since both families came from the same region in France during the same time period, we are hoping to find a connection!

Streets and Signs

It’s neat to come across streets that were named in honor of my families’ ancestors. It’s adds to their stories and certainly indicates that they were well thought of in their communities! He are some pictures of the street signs I’ve found.

The first one is located in Plymouth, MA. Bradford Street is named after one of my most famous ancestors, Governor William Bradford of the Plymouth Colony. He is my ninth great grandfather.

My wife’s maiden name is Harvey. Harvey Road, in Jackson Co., MI, is named after her great grandfather Herbert Harvey, who farmed there.

Another ancestral line of my wife’s is Notten. Her third great grandfather, Ehlert Notten, came to America from England and farmed in Waterloo Twp., Jackson Co., MI.

My 4th great grandfather, Isaac Ormsbee, settled in north of Greenfield, near Porter Corners, Saratoga Co., NY in 1796. The old family cemetery is along Ormsbee Rd.

Musbach Rd. in Washtenaw County, MI, is name after my wife’s Musbach family, who farmed nearby.

Hienrich Heinke, my 2nd great grandfather settled and farmed in Royalton Twp., Waupaca Co., WI.

My wife’s 2nd great grandfather, Damien Heim, came from Germany and settled in Sylvan Twp., Washtenaw Co., MI

This last one wasn’t exactly named after one of my family members (at least we haven’t proven it yet). Thibeau Voiland came to America from Cravanche, Belfort, France and settle in Erin Twp. (Roseville), Macomb Co., MI.

I also descend from Voilands who came from an area very close to Cravanche, but we haven’t been able to connect the two families! Maybe the addition of the sign here with help to prove or disprove the connection.

Surname Saturday | HEINKE

My 2nd great grandparents, Heinrich (Friedrick) Heinke, and his wife Eliese (Schroebke), along with their two daughters, landed in New York at Castle Garden on October 27, 1860.  The ship’s record indicates that they had been living in Bretwisch (West Pomerania) Prussia (later a part of East Germany) before going to Hamburg to board the ship, “Deutschland”.  They arrived in Eldorado Twp., Fond du Lac Co., WI in the fall of 1860.  Three children, including my great grandmother Laura, were born to them while living there.  In 1879, they moved to the farm in Royalton Township, Waupaca Co.  Laura would have been 17 at the time. Four years later she married Frank Weller.

We have been unable to trace the Heinke line farther back than Heinrich. His father may have been name Karl, but that hasn’t been substantiated. Heinrich and Eliese are buried in Little Wolf Cemetery – Manawa, Waupaca Co.

Today’s Tidbit | October 27, 1860 – Heinrich and Eliese Heinke

On this day, 149 years ago, my 2nd great grandparents, Hienrich and Eliese (Schroebke) Heinke along with their 2 daughters, Caroline and Amelia, arrived at Castle Garden in New York City. The ship’s record indicates that they had been living in Bretwisch (West Pomerania) Prussia (later, part of East Germany) before traveling to Hamburg to board the ship, “Deutschland“. E. Wesselhöft was the ship’s master.

"Deutschland" passenger list showing Heinke family

"Deutschland" passenger list showing Heinke family (click to enlarge)

The Heinkes arrived in Eldorado Twp., Fond du Lac Co., WI in the fall of 1860. Three more children, Laura, Elisabeth, and Reinhard were born to them while living there. In 1879, they settled on the farm in Royalton Township. The location of their farm can be seen on this 1890 plat map.

Heinke property in Royalton Twp., Waupaca Co., WI (click to enlarge)

Heinke property in Royalton Twp., Waupaca Co., WI (click to enlarge)

This Heinke Rd. sign marks the way to the former location of the Heinke farm.

IMG_4393

Sign for street leading into former sight of the Heinke farm in Royalton Twp.

In 1883, their daughter, Laura, married Frank Weller, who had a farm nearby.

Heinrich and Eliese Heinke are both buried in Little Wolf Cemetery, Manawa, Waupaca Co., WI