Today’s Tidbit | Katherine (Tuepper) Hau/Butz

I was recently given a copy of a photo of my 2nd great grandmother, Katherine (Tuepper) Hau. I had only seen one picture of her and that was taken when she was elderly. This new photo was taken when she was a much younger woman.

Katherine-Tuepper

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Katherine married my 2nd great grandfather, Wilhelm Hau, in 1869. Wilhelm passed away in 1884, at the age of 42. More about Wilhelm can be read in the previous post located here. Katherine married John Butz in 1887.

Today’s Tidbit | Lorenz Heller

A cousin, who lives in South Dakota, sent me some information she found concerning my 3rd great grandfather. She’s been helping trying to locate his grave in SD. While she didn’t have any further information on that, she did find this article about him in the Grant County (South Dakota) review dated March 10th, 1892:

(Lorenz Heller), an old man over 70 years of age, residing four miles north of Revillo, was rolled and trampled by an infuriated bull on Monday afternoon, and died from the effects of the injuries the same night. The animal was de-horned and the old man was endeavoring to drive it into the stable with a pitchfork when it turned upon him.

Lorenz was born in Prussia in 1817. He arrived with his family at Castle Garden in New York City on May 16, 1866. They settled in Wisconsin and then went to South Dakota in about 1881.

Today’s Tidbit | Esther (Hau) & James Roy Anderson

While trying to fill in some empty gaps in my tree, I came across this interesting information about my 2nd cousin, Esther (Hau) Anderson, and her husband, James. Esther was born in Fond du Lac, WI in 1904. She is listed in the 1925 and 1927 Racine, WI city directories as a teacher. She married James Roy Anderson, who was born in Racine.

What I discovered was that James Roy Anderson was a Brigadier General during WWII. He and Esther are listed in the 1930 US Census as living in the Schofield Barracks in Honolulu. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1926, served at various Army installations, and obtained his wings at Kelly Field, Texas, in 1936. During 1943-1944 he served on the War Department General Staff. In January 1945, General Andersen was assigned to HQ AAF, Pacific Ocean Area.

General Anderson was declared killed in action after an aircraft accident on 26 February 1945 over the Pacific Ocean, near Kwajalein Island, en route to Hawaii. Andersen Air Force Base, in the United States territory Guam is named in his honor.

Esther never remarried and passed away in Georgia in 1988.

Today’s Tidbit

STRANGERS IN THE BOX

by Pam Harazim

Come, look with me inside this drawer,
In this box I’ve often seen,
At the pictures, black and white,
Faces proud, still, and serene.
I wish I knew the people,
These strangers in the box,
Their names and all their memories,
Are lost among my socks.
I wonder what their lives were like,
How did they spend their days?
What about their special times?
I’ll never know their ways.
If only someone had taken time,
To tell who, what, where, and when,
These faces of my heritage,
Would come to life again.
Could this become the fate,
Of the pictures we take today?
The faces and the memories,
Someday to be passed away?
Take time to save your stories,
Seize the opportunity when it knocks,
Or someday you and yours,
Could be strangers in the box.

Today’s Tidbit | WWII Ration Book

This is my grandma’s War Ration Book No 3.

Four different series of war ration books were issued. “Book No. 3″ series books were issued in October of 1943. Each ration stamp has a  drawing of an airplane, gun, tank, aircraft carrier, ear of wheat, or fruit, etc. and a serial number. My book is missing a couple of pages and only contains stamps with the airplane, aircraft carrier, tank and artillery. Rationing ended in 1946.

Much more on rationing during WWII can be found here.

Asa Benjamin and the Revolutionary War

On May 4th, 1775, my 4th great grandfather enlisted in the Revolutionary War. Asa Benjamin joined at Worthington, MA. He served eight months as a private and was discharged on December 23, 1775. He re-enlisted and was discharged six times from first enlistment to his final discharge in 1781.

Asa was born in Preston, New London, CT in 1754. He descended from the Benjamin family that came to America with John Winthrop and the Great Puritan Migration in 1632.

It was during one of his re-enlistments that Benjamin transferred to Valley Forge, PA on March 19, 1778 and served in the Commander-in-Chief’s Guard protecting George Washington. The Guard was an elite group of soldiers who were chosen to protect against a surprise raid on Washington’s headquarters.

On March 11, 1776, General Washington issued the following orders:

“Head-Quarters, Cambridge March 11, 1776

The General is desirous of selecting a particular number of men as a guard for himself and baggage.  The Colonel or Commanding Officer of each of the established regiments, the artillery and riflemen excepted, will furnish him with four, that the number of wanted may be chosen out of them.  His Excellency depends upon the Colonels for good men, such as they can recommend for their sobriety, honesty and good behavior.  He wishes them to be from five feet eight inches to five feet ten inches, handsomely and well made, and as there is nothing in his eyes more desirable than cleanliness in a soldier, he desires that particular attention be made in the choice of such men as are clean and spruce.  They are to be at headquarters tomorrow precisely at 12 o’clock at noon, when the number wanted will be fixed upon.  The General neither wants them with uniforms nor arms, nor does he desire any man to be sent to him that is not perfectly willing or desirous of being in this Guard. – They should be drilled men.”

Commander in Chief Guard Flag

After serving for a few months in the Guard, Benjamin returned home to work on his farm. He soon re-enlisted and eventually earned the rank of lieutenant.

An historian talked to Asa’s great grandson, Reuben, who recalled having seen the old uniform that his ancestor had worn. “It was moth-eaten and worn and was hung in the barn. It was finally torn up as rags for some use around the farm. It may have been used in wiping off the spindles of the carriage when grease anew.”

Asa Benjamin and his family moved to Pierpont, Ashtabula Co., OH in 1811. He died on December 28, 1825 and is buried in the family plot in Pierpont’s  Hall Rd. (Sam Brown) Cemetery.

Benjamin Family Plot

Asa Benjamin Headstone

Today’s Tidbit | March 27, 1797 – Charles Francois Xavier Voiland

On this date, in 1797, my third great grandfather, Charles Francois Xavier Voiland, was born in Essert, Belfort, France. He was a farmer. In October of 1857, at the age of 60, he emigrated to America with his wife, Adelaide, and daughters, Madelaine, Catherine Philomen, Julie and Adele.

More about the Voiland/Weller family can be found here.

Working in the Mills

An aspect of researching my family history that really interests me is the occupations of my ancestors. A common occupation that crops up again and again is working in various types of mills.

My Harris family has a long history in the mills. Ezekial Harris owned a saw mill in Bedford, NY in the the mid 1700′s. Nelson Harris built a saw mill in Cato, WI and then in Forest Junction, WI in the 1850′s. It was Forest Junction’s first business and was later operated by his brother, Isaac. Nelson’s son, Orville, worked in the Cato mill and later was an engineer in at a flour mill in Appleton, WI.

Walter Kachelski came to America in 1870, and during his early years, was employed as a weaver in a woolen mill in Beaver Dam, WI

Reuben Perry Benjamin operated a saw mill in Pierpont, Ohio in the mid 1800′s

In 1897, Daniel Webster Allen build the first grist mill in Custer, MI.

In the mid-1800′s, Lysander Ormsby operated a stave mill in Deerfield, MI. Stave mills produced the narrow strips of wood that composed the sides of barrels.