Wilhelm Hau Photograph

I was lucky enough, last week, to come into contact with a cousin who found my tree on Ancestry.com. She and I are 3rd cousins and we both descend from Wilhelm Hau and Kathrine Tuepper.

I have known about Wilhelm for a long time. He was born in 1842 in Prussia. He became a wealthy land owner and had tenant farms. According to stories, he served in the Prussian army and had a crippled little finger. He played the violin and was a choir director. Because of political reasons, Wilhelm immigrated to the United States, probably in the mid-1860’s, and settled in Russell Twp., Sheboygan Co., WI. There, he farmed and was the choir master at St. Joe Catholic Church.

Wilhelm died in 1884, at the age of 42. I haven’t yet been able determine how he died. He and Kathrine had 9 children.

I’ve never known what Wilhelm looked like – until now! My new newly-found cousin has a picture of him and emailed it to me today. I can now put a face to my 3rd great grandfather.

Wilhelm-Hau

Maria Katherine Fuhrmann and the Presidential Proclamation of April 19, 1918

Early on in the United States’ involvement in WWI, non-naturalized citizens, or “enemy aliens”, were required to register with U.S. authorities in the interest of national security. A presidential proclamation on November 16, 1917 included all non-citizen males over the age of 14, and their wives, even those women born in the United States but married to non-citizens. The registration focused primarily on non-citizen German residents, but included Italians and other nationalities, as well. The information derived from this registration included immigration, birth and parentage, names of family members, address, occupation and employer; residents were also asked if they were sympathetic to the enemy and the names of any relatives serving in enemy forces. Registrations included a physical description, fingerprints and a photograph. An act of Congress on 16 April 1918 changed the definition of “alien enemy” to include women age 14 and older, and a presidential proclamation followed on April 19, 1918.

My 2nd great grandmother, Maria Katherine Michels, was born in Germany on April 13, 1842. She came to the United State in 1856 and, according to the 1920 US Census, became a naturalized citizen in 1869. On June 19, 1860, Maria married Anton Fuhrmann. He was also born in Germany and became a citizen – this according to the 1910 Census.

Once an “enemy alien” had registered, “After the date fixed by the Attorney General for such registration, an alien enemy shall not be found within the limits of the United States, its territories or possessions, without having his registration card on his person.” Penalties for not carrying the card could include imprisonment.

This is the “Registration Card of Alien Female” issued to Maria K. Fuhrmann on June 25, 1918. What is a little confusing to me is that, according to the census, both she and Anton were naturalized citizens. If this was the case, I don’t believe she was required to register. But, then again, the census could be wrong.

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Marie and Anton were farmers in Marshfield Township, Fond du lac Co., WI. After Anton died in 1912, Marie moved to the city of Fond du Lac to live with 3 of her children. She passed away in 1923 and is buried in Johnsburg, WI.

Backgrounds of My Families

This is some background information for the eight families (mine and my wife’s) of my grandparents’ generation.

Harris

Our Harris family is of English decent. Their ancestry can be traced back to the earliest days of our country. John Earl Harris was born in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., NY in 1798. He married Nancy Ormsbee in 1820. The Ormsbee family originally came to America in the 1630′s, settling in Maine, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Nancy’s father Joshua fought in the Revolutionary War and travelled to Greenfield with his family around 1796. John Earl, Nancy and their descendents moved on to Pierpont Ohio, Town of Morgan Indiana, and eventually Cato, Manitowoc Co., WI. There, they engaged in the mill business. Related families include Seybold, Protz, Cleveland, Ormsbee, Benjamin, Newcomb and Bradford.

Harvey

George Harvey and his wife Elizabeth (Louden) were married in England in 1859. Soon after, they came to America and settled in Leoni Twp., Jackson Co., Michigan. Their son and grandson farmed on Harvey Road in Waterloo Twp., Jackson Co., MI. Related families include Musbach, Louden, Notten and Kruse.

Hau

Came to America from Prussia in the early 1860′s. According to family stories, Wilhelm Hau was a land owner in Prussia. He settled in Russel Twp., Sheboygan Co., Wisconsin. He married Kathrine Tuepper in January of 1869. Her family was also from Prussia and settled in Marshfield Twp., Fond du Lac Co., WI, where they farmed. Wilhelm and Kathrine’s descendants remained in the county, with our family owning a restaurant in Fond du Lac. Related families include Fuhrmann, Tuepper and Michels.

Heim

Our Heim family came to America in the 1840′s. Damian Heim was born in Steinbach Germany in 1815. His wife, Regina, was from the same area. They settled in Sylvan Twp., Washtenaw Co., Michigan. Related families include Gage, Hoppe, Parker, Knight and Lombard.

Hela/Heller

Laurentius Hela, his wife Elizabeth (Fleming), and their five children arrived in America from Prussia/Poland in May of 1866. They settled in Princeton, Green Lake Co., Wisconsin. Their grandson, Francis (Frank) married Catherine Jackowski in 1905. Her family was also from Prussia/Poland. Frank worked in the granite quarry in Montello, WI. Related families include Jackowski, Soda and Swiderski.

LeVan

The LeVan family was among the German-speaking French Huguenot refugees who fled from France to Holland, probably after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. Family tradition says they were manufacturers of brocade and taffetas in their native country, and that they were of considerable wealth.

Jacob LeVan was born about 1702 in Amsterdam. Records indicate he came to America around 1717. Jacob married Mary about 1725 in Maxatawny Twp., Berks Co., Pennsylvania. The family lived for many generations in Berks Co. They moved to Logan Co., Ohio and eventually to Waterloo Twp., Jackson Co., Michigan. Related families include Robison, Winner, Leymaster and Leidigh.

McConnell

Our McConnell family can only be traced back to the early 1800′s. Charles Russell McConnell was born in New York in 1828. He married Sophia Laib in Kent Co., Michigan in 1859. She was born in Ohio in 1837. They farmed in Carmel Twp., Eaton Co., MI. Related families include Bradley, Laib, Blackmer, Kimball and Lankton.

Voiland/Weller

Originated from the town of Essert in the Territory of Belfort, France. Charles Xavier (Jean Baptiste) Voiland, his wife Adelaide (Perrin) and their children arrived at Castle Garden in New York City in December of 1857. His son Joseph Voiland and wife Felicitée Marie (Sadie) Romond arrived in New York City in May of 1857. Sadie’s family was from the town of Urcerey, also in the Territory of Belfort. Joseph and Sadie traveled to Buffalo, NY, and then settled in Little Wolf Twp., Waupaca County, Wisconsin.

The family name was changed to “Weller” when their children started school in Wisconsin. Their German school teacher couldn’t pronounce the French name “Voiland” and so it was changed to reflect the German pronunciation “Weller”. Their descendants remained in Waupaca County, with our family living in Clintonville and owning a hardware store. Related families include Heinke, Romond and Eglin.

There was also a Voiland family that came from Cravanche, another small village in the Territory of Belfort, France, in the 1850’s. Thibeau (Tebo) Voiland, his wife Marie (Frossard), and their eight children arrived in America on October 15, 1852, and settled in Macomb Co., Michigan, just north of Detroit. The homestead was located a short distance west of Gratiot Avenue between what is now Fourteen Mile Road and Masonic Boulevard.

We are unable to connect the Michigan Voilands to our Wisconsin Voilands. Since both families came from the same region in France during the same time period, we are hoping to find a connection!

Family Matters | EMILE ROMON

Emile Francois Romon was born in 1834 in Urcerey, France. He made his apprenticeship as a blacksmith and worked in several localities of the region before his departure for the United States in 1854. He often entertained the younger generation with graphic descriptions of his trip to America, which was by sailing vessel and lasted six weeks.  For a year, he lived in the state of New York, and then came westward.  He settled in the town of Royalton, Wisconsin.

Emile enlisted in the Civil War in 1864. He was a private in Company F, 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery.

Born:  June 2, 1834 in Urcerey, Belfort, France
Married:  Anna Conroy on June 23, 1859 in WI, Elizabeth Rossey on September 2, 1869 in WI
Died:  November 19, 1915 in Weyauwega, Waupaca Co., WI

Relation:  2nd Great Grand Uncle

 

 

 

 

Family Matters | HENRY HERRICK

Henry Herrick, along with his wife Editha, were among the original thirty who founded the First Church of Salem, MA in 1629. This was the first Puritan Church in the new colony. They arrived as part of the Higginson and Skelton fleet (Winthrop) to Salem in 1629.  Rev. Francis Higginson and Rev. Samuel Skelton were the spiritual leaders of the fleet of five ships and about 300 settlers sent to Nahumkeake (Salem) by the Massachusetts Bay Company in 1629.

Born:  1598 in England
Married:  Editha Laskin about 1630 in Salem, Essex Co., Massachusetts Bay Colony
Died:  March 28, 1671 in Beverly, Essex Co., Massachusetts Bay Colony

Relation:  9th Great Grandfather

Family Matters | LYSANDER ORMSBY

Lysander Ormsby was born in Massachusetts and lived there until April of 1837, when resolving to see something of the great West, he started out and made his way by team to Albany, NY, the nearest point to the Erie Canal, and then by canal to Buffalo.

After arriving in Buffalo, Lysander had to wait two weeks for the ice to break up. He hired a team to Dunkirk and then took a steamer for Toledo, OH, which was just a small village. From there he made his way to Blissfield, MI via the Erie and Kalamazoo Railroad, which had just been completed to Adrian. The train cars were pulled by horses over wooden rails.

Lysander spent his first summer in Blissfield and then moved to nearby Summerfield Township, where he purchased thirty-five acres of timber land and put up a log house. He had married Olive Burnham in 1840, and a substantial frame dwelling took the place of the log cabin. They later moved to Deerfield where he worked as a clerk in a general store. Two years later, he bought a stave mill and then opened a grocery store.

After 1877, Lysander devoted his time and attention to the duties of his office. He was appointed Notary Public in 1855, and continued to receive the appointment every four years after that for many years.  He served as postmaster for a period of ten years and was Village Attorney for some time.

Born:  July 5, 1855 in Westhampton, Hampshire Co., MA
Married:  Olive Clerinda Burnham on February 27, 1840, Mary Ellen Masters on February 24, 1887
Died:  January 23, 1911 in Deerfield, Lenawee Co., MI and is buried in the Deerfield Twp. Cemetery

Relation:  5th cousin, 4 times removed

**Much of this content was taken from An Index of Pioneers from Massachusetts to the West. The photo courtesy of http://www.ormsby.org.

 

Family Matters | SAMUEL CLEAVELAND

He spelled his name Samuell. One of the first to settle in Connecticut, he joined the migration of families to found the new town of Canterbury. He served as a soldier in King Philip’s War in 1675/76 and held the rank of Sergeant. A petition was written to the army, from his brother Moses, to release Samuel early. Moses was injured, and could not bring in the crops without Samuel’s help. Samuel was released.

Born:  June 9, 1657 in Woburn, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts Bay Colony
Married:  3 times – Jane Keyes, Persis Hildreth, Margaret Fish
Died:  March 12, 1736 in Canterbury, Windham Co., Connecticut Colony

Buried:  Cleveland Cemetery, Canterbury, CT

Relation:  7th Great Grandfather

Deborah Sampson – Revolutionary War Soldier and American Folk Hero

Deborah Sampson was the first known American woman to impersonate a man in order to join the army and take part in combat. She was born in Plympton, MA on December 17, 1760, the oldest of three daughters and three sons to Jonathan and Deborah Bradford Sampson.

Deborah is my 3rd cousin, 7 times removed. We both descend from William Bradford, Governor of the Plymouth Colony. I descend from Bradford’s son, William IV. Deborah descends from his other son, Joseph.

Sampson’s youth was spent in poverty. Her father abandoned the family and went off to sea. Her mother was of poor health and could not support the children, so she sent them off to live with various neighbors and relatives. At the young age of ten, Sampson became an indentured servant in the household of Jeremiah Thomas in Middleborough, MA. For ten years she helped with the housework and worked in the fields, which helped developed her physical strength. She attended school in the Winter since there wasn’t as much farm work to be done. She learned enough so that, after her servitude ended in 1779, she was hired as a teacher in a Middleborough public school.

On May 20, 1782, when she was twenty-one, Sampson enlisted in the Fourth Massachusetts Regiment of the Continental Army at Bellingham as a man named Robert Shurtliff (also listed as Shirtleff or Shirtlieff). Robert Shurtliff Sampson was the name of her deceased brother. Being almost 5 foot 8 inches tall, she was almost a foot taller than the average woman of her day and taller than the average man. Other soldiers teased her about not having to shave, but they assumed that this “boy” was just too young to grow facial hair. She performed her duties as well as any other man.

Back home, rumors circulated about her  and she was excommunicated from the First Baptist Church of Middleborough, MA, because of a strong suspicion that she was “dressing in man’s clothes and enlisting as a Soldier in the Army.”

Although the last major battle of the Revolution had been fought the previous October when Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, guerilla warfare was still being fought in several areas by Tories refusing to surrender. It was during one of these skirmishes that Shurtleff suffered a forehead wound from a sabre slash and then was hit by a musket ball in the upper left front thigh. At a field hospital, a French doctor bound up the head wound, but was not advised of the thigh injury. When the doctor began to attend another wounded soldier, Shurtleff limped out of the hospital, and later, removed the musket ball herself.

However, when he was later hospitalized for fever, the physician attending her discovered that she was a woman and made discreet arrangements that ended her military career. Sampson was honorably discharged from the army at West Point on October 25, 1783.

Deborah Sampson returned home, married a farmer named Benjamin Gannett, and had three children. She also taught at a nearby school. About nine years after her discharge from the army, she was awarded a pension from the state of Massachusetts in the amount of thirty-four pounds in a lump payment. After Paul Revere sent a letter to Congress on her behalf in 1804, she started receiving a U.S. pension in the amount of four dollars per month. In 1802, Sampson traveled throughout New England and New York giving lectures on her experiences in the military. During her lectures, she wore the military uniform.

Deborah Sampson Gannett died April 29, 1827 in Sharon, MA, at age sixty-six. Her children were awarded compensation by a special act of Congress “for the relief of the heirs of Deborah Gannett, a soldier of the Revolution, deceased.” She is buried in the Rock Ridge Cemetery in Sharon.

On May 23, 1983, Governor Michael J. Dukakis signed a proclamation which declared that Deborah Samson was the Official Heroine of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Two news services stated this was the first time in the history of the United States that any state had proclaimed anyone as the official hero or heroine.

Born:  December 17, 1760 in Plympton, Plymouth Co., MA
Married:  Benjamin Gannett on April 17, 1784
Died:  April 29, 1827 in Sharon, Norfolk Co., MA and is buried in Rock Ridge Cemetery, Sharon, MA

Relation: 3rd  cousin, 7 times removed